Vegetarian

Shakshuka with feta and smoky eggplant

Thumbnail image for Shakshuka with feta and smoky eggplant September 20, 2014

Shakshuka. It’s not fussy. The details don’t matter, nor the total focus of the cook. A glug or two of olive oil, a couple of tomatoes simmered into softness- canned will do in a cinch- and eggs. That’s really all you need. Or, if the pantry or mood allows, embellishments are added. Cumin, onions, garlic, […]

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Yemenite hot sauce

Thumbnail image for Yemenite hot sauce October 24, 2013

Schoog (schug), the fiery hot sauce of the Yemeni Jews is no longer a culinary curiosity of a small ethnic group but part of Israel’s communal table.  This happened gradually, as Yemenite Jews began immigrating to the area in 1881, with the largest wave arriving during Operation Magic Carpet which brought nearly 500,000 Yemeni Jews […]

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Spring in the summer- in search of the perfect waterhole

Thumbnail image for Spring in the summer- in search of the perfect waterhole August 2, 2013

Above: Left Belvoir Crusader Fortress, also known Kohav HaYarden Right thistles growing nearby This summer I decided to embrace the heat, humidity and jellyfish. That is not as trivial as it sounds. Some mornings, I wake up to the burden of 9 km of atmosphere sitting on my chest….but I digress.  I’m on a complain detox […]

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The slow life of Triticum, in photos

Thumbnail image for The slow life of Triticum, in photos May 4, 2013

Wheat, for the most part, is an industrial product of the modern world. It is grown by companies the size of small cities with farms bigger than some countries. Except with a bit of help from the sun, the process is highly technical, with advanced machinery utilized for every phase of the production.  Gone are […]

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A different kind of kibbeh

Thumbnail image for A different kind of kibbeh April 17, 2013

Red lentil kibbeh is the outlier of the Middle Eastern dumplings. It bears little resemblance to its name sake. Who bestowed it with such a prestigious title? What does it have in common with the sleek, crispy bulgur shells stuffed with cinnamon scented meat? Or the turmeric colored semolina patties simmering in aromatic vegetable soup? […]

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